How far will you go?

The Arkansas State women’s bowling team was ranked fourth in the National Tenpin Coaches Association Preseason Media Poll that was released Tuesday.
A-State finished last season ranked fourth after advancing to the NCAA Tournament Semifinals in its sixth straight NCAA Tournament appearance. The Red Wolves finished with a 91-34 mark and set the school record for wins and has accumulated a record of 319-135.
Up till the present moment, three players named to All-American teams placing one each on the first, second, and third teams, they are Rachael Gittings, Amanda Labossiere and Sarah Lokker.The head coach Kostick led the Red Wolves to the NCAA Women’s Bowling Championships for the fifth straight season in 2012, and he was also the recipient of the NTCA Coach of the Year Award in 2012.
The goal for this team is to bring a national championship to Arkansas State, to achieve this aim, A-state needs not only these girls’ hard practice, the head coach’s correct and helpful guide, but also their families, their fans and even all the Red Wolves’ support.
How far will you go?
Red Wolves, HAWL!

(By CrusaderBowling)
Related links:
http://www.rulesofbowling.com/
http://www.jonesborobowl.com/
http://www.bowl.com/

Advertisements

Women Can Do It Too!

unnamedFootball is known for being a male dominated sport. But, when it comes to intramural football, women have a chance to show their talents. Intramural women’s football also know as ‘Powder-puff football’, is one of the most talked about intramural sports at Arkansas State. NFL football and intramural football have different rules and techniques when playing this sport. Intramural women’s powder puff football or flag football is a sports that is less intense and physical than NFL football, collegiate football, and even men’s intramural football.

In the NFL and college football, the players are allowed to tackle and run with the ball that best fits them. However, in flag football you aren’t able to make physical contact with the opposing player nor are you able to cup the ball under your arm and run with it. Senior LaPaige Hill,  of the BSA Crew says ” Running with our hands in the air can me difficult especially when your close to making a touchdown.” The biggest factor about playing flag football is physical contact. In contrast to regular football, the only contact that you have with the player is pulling the flag from the opposing teams belt/waist. If their is any contact made between the defensive or offensive player you will be penalized.

Powder-Puff football for women can be competitive and challenging. ” I love this  game but at times women we play hard and have prove that we are just as good as men to our audience. With a crowed we more determine to show up and show out,” Hill says. Arkansas state has a variety of intramural sports that allow women to showcase their talent. Basketball, football and table tennis are sports that are offered to both women and men at Arkansas State.

n

Powder Puff football is a sport that will never fade. Even though, football is a sport that is competitive and physical it will always be shared with women.

http://www.astate.edu/a/campus-recreation/intramurals/sport-rules/index.dot

Arkansas State Ultimate Frisbee

 

Image

 

Unbeknownst to some, there are multiple club sports located on the campus of Arkansas State University. However, most do not realize that there is a sport in which anyone can play. That sport is known as ultimate frisbee.

Ultimate frisbee is a simple game. Some play for fun though, while others play for competition. Some have played the game since they were little, while others are just learning the game. Not all players are major athletes, most students are from all different majors of all different walks of life.

So now that the introduction is out of the way, what exactly is ultimate frisbee? First and foremost, there are two teams, named A and B. There are 15 players to a team, with 7 players actually out on the field during the action. Most of the practices for the Red Wolves take place on Mondays at the Old Track and Field in front of the Convocation Center. Pickup games are held on Thursdays for new members wishing to join. Other rules are listed below as follows.

  1. The Field: A rectangular shape with end zones at each end. A regulation field is 70 yards by 40 yards, with end zones 25 yards deep.
     
  2. Initiate Play: Each point begins with both teams lining up on the front of their respective end zone line. The defense throws (“pulls”) the disc to the offense. A regulation game has seven players per team.
     
  3. Scoring: Each time the offense completes a pass in the defense’s end zone, the offense scores a point. Play is initiated after each score.
     
  4. Movement of the Disc: The disc may be advanced in any direction by completing a pass to a teammate. Players may not run with the disc. The person with the disc (“thrower”) has ten seconds to throw the disc. The defender guarding the thrower (“marker”) counts out the stall count.
     
  5. Change of Possession: When a pass is not completed (e.g. out of bounds, drop, block, interception), the defense immediately takes possession of the disc and becomes the offense.
     
  6. Substitutions: Players not in the game may replace players in the game after a score and during an injury timeout.
     
  7. Non-contact: No physical contact is allowed between players. Picks and screens are also prohibited. A foul occurs when contact is made.
     
  8. Fouls: When a player initiates contact on another player a foul occurs. When a foul disrupts possession, the play resumes as if the possession was retained. If the player committing the foul disagrees with the foul call, the play is redone.
     
  9. Self-Officiating: Players are responsible for their own foul and line calls. Players resolve their own disputes.
     
  10. Spirit of the Game: Ultimate stresses sportsmanship and fair play. Competitive play is encouraged, but never at the expense of respect between players, adherence to the rules, and the basic joy of play.

So there you go. Some of the basic rules. Now, what about Frisbee styles? Some may think that all a person does is throw the frisbee, yet there are different ways in which the frisbee can be thrown.

“There are different styles of throwing the frisbee,” frisbee player Dylan Travis said. “From the Forehand, the Backhand, the Flick, the Hammer, the Scoober, you name it, there different ways to throw the frisbee.”

When it comes to the club sport, a major problem can be funding. The Frisbee club receives funding from the ASU Action Fund and the Play It Again Sports, which is an athletic equipment retailer in Jonesboro.

Overall, the Frisbee club is still up and coming, much like the other club sports on the campus. One thing it has going for it though, is the interest garnered by students who know the game. That will help the sport tremendously in terms of attracting new players, and eventually (possibly), enough funding to form a potential NCAA Team.

Links:

http://www.usaultimate.org/index.html

http://www.usaultimate.org/mobile/default.aspx

http://www.usaultimate.org/resources/officiating/rules/default.aspx

http://www.asuherald.com/mobile/news/ultimate-frisbee-club-joins-asu-1.2798698

Link

Clara Tefteller

Clara Tefteller

Height: 5’5″

Year: Senior

Hometown: Paragould, Arkansas

High School: Greene County Tech

Clara Tefteller has played for four years for the Arkansas State Lady Redwolves Golf team. She is majoring in Clinical Laboratory Sciences and is working on becoming a physician assistant at the Children’s Hospital in Little Rock, Arkansas after graduating in August of 2014.  The daughter of Robby Tefteller and Lana Guinn has 2 brothers Blake and Jack and 1 sister Ellen. Although they may not be athletes like Clara they are there to support her in everything she does. The 5’5″ senior played all four years at her high school before signing to play for the Lady Redwolves.

In the 2010 season entering her freshman year she finished 24th in the Lady Red Wolf Classic. Shot a low round of 82 in the third round of both tournaments. Clara Tefteller also had been named to the Sun Belt Conference Commissioner’s List.

In her sophomore year entering the Lady Red Wolf Classic once again she improved to a round of 75 in the second round instead of her previous appearance back in her freshman year. Although she tied for 29th in the tournament. She was again named to the Sun Belt Conference Commissioner’s List.

After completing her freshman and sophomore year she entered her 2012-2013. Clara shot a season-best low round of 77 and finished tied for 27th out of 45 players.

http://www.astateredwolves.com/

http://www.astateredwolves.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=36807&SPID=2799&DB_LANG=C&DB_OEM_ID=7200&ATCLID=205053037&Q_SEASON=2013

Player Profile– Sadie Clark

ImageSadie Clark is a senior Journalism major from Wichita, Kansas.  She has been on Arkansas State University’s Volleyball team since 2010.  She is number 17 and plays both setter and outer hitter position.  The 5’11 senior’s father played football at Kansas State University before going to the NFL.  She has an older sister, Destiny, who played volleyball at the University of Arkansas and an older brother, Zac, who played football at Oregon.  She has a younger brother, Trace, who currently plays football at Oregon State. So with that being said being athletic seems to run through their veins.

In the 2010 season, Clark had 182 kills which was her first season as a Red Wolf.  That was when she had a season high of 17 kills in ASU’s 3-1 win at UALR and during the same match she had a season high of 16 digs.  Clark had 190 digs during that season and ranked second on the team with 21 service aces.

In the 2011 season, Clark played 15 of ASU’s 31 games. She had a season high of seven kills and a career high of .636 attacking percentage against Alcorn State University and had a season high of seven digs against UAB.  She finished the season with 43 kills, 27 digs and a total of 10 blocks.

In the 2012 season, Clark played in 12  games (five of which she started) and had a season high of 12 kills against Troy and a career high of 12 assists against Bethune-Cookman and finished the season with 48 kills, 14 assists, 13 digs and eight total blocks.

This season, senior Sadie Clark leads the Red Wolves in kills with 258 and averaging 3.15 kills per set. Clark currently ranks fifth in the Sun Belt Conference with her kills per set average. Over the weekend, Clark led the team with 34 kills and an average of 3.40 kills per set.

 Image

2012 SEASON HIGHS

Kills …………………………………………………………..12 vs Troy (10/5)

Attacks ………………………………………………………34 vs Troy (10/5)

Hitting Percentage ………………………………..200 at Missouri (11/6)

Digs………………………………….4, 2x, last vs South Alabama (10/7)

Assists……………………………………..12 vs Bethune-Cookman (9/8)

Aces ………………………………………………………………………………..0

Blocks …………………………………………..4 vs South Alabama (10/7)

CAREER HIGHS

Kills…………………………………………………………17 at UALR (11/9/10)

Attacks ………………………………………….47 vs North Texas (11/6/10)

Hittings Percentage …………………………………636 vs Alcorn (9/9/11)

Digs ……………………………………………………….16 at UALR (11/9/10)

Assists……………………………………12 vs Bethune-Cookman (9/8/12)

Aces …………………………………..4, 2x, last vs North Texas (11/6/10)

Blocks…………………………….4, 2x, last vs South Alabama (10/7/12)

Best Defender: Megan Baska

#8  Megan Baska

Position: Defensive Specialist/ Libero

Height:5’9″

Year:Senior

Hometown: Overland, Kan

Megan Baska

Congratulations!!!

Megan just got her 11th career Sun Belt Conference Defensive Player of Week award, which is the SBC record for career DPOW awards.

She has really brilliant performance. She was in 2010 and 2012 Sun Belt Conference Second Team All-Conference. Also, she is in the third place in digs career leader in Red wolves Records. She just needs 62 more digs, than she will become the second player in Arkansas State history to record 2,000 digs. She has 371 digs for a 4.47 per set average, which ranks second in Sun Belt Conference.

A-State Woman Volleyball

Sun Belt Conference Woman Volleyball

USA Woman Volleyball

Rugby Fitness

One thing that no one can deny about the sport of ruby is that the players…yeah, they are buff. Most  people can spot a rugby player by his physical physique. Just like in all sports, each workout is crucial in making the players better at the sport. Every lift, squat and curl serves a purpose in the team’s success.

Harry Higgins feels the burn while doing curls

Harry Higgins feels the burn while doing curls

Harry Higgins, a junior on the team, believes lifting and getting in shape is a very important part of rugby. “It develops strength and size. Which in our game, instead of having pads, this is what we use to protect ourselves.”

Higgins does upper body work for protection. In his positions of lock, flank and the 8 position, his opponents are larger than him. “It comes down to a safety issue.”

Although all the players do the same exercises, it translates differently for different positions. Jonathan Mbaya, a center and wing for the team, said what he does helps him help the team. “It’s important that we lift heavy and we do it the same. Just because it’ll help me do my job better for him (Higgins) and him do his job better for me, for the team.”

Jonathan Mbaya building muscle.

Jonathan Mbaya building muscle.

What workouts do the players do to get those signature legs? It all starts with squats, front squats and back squats. Front squats provide front leg strength which is needed for players, especially forwards and even backs, during scrums. Scrums are set plays in rugby. Front squats develop power and speed. RDL is the Romanian Deadlifts. It works the hamstring, glutes and lower back.  Box jumps enhance strength, speed and endurance. Rugby players often jump off one leg and do side jumps and box jumps makes them better.

With bodies of steel, you can only guess how many compliments they get. “I get compliments on my butt,” said Mbaya, “I get a lot of compliments from women. Guys look at you funny like when you walk in the cafe with the short shorts, you get some funny looks.”

“People love the shorts, the girls love the short shorts. Not the guys, the guys hate us for it. But haters gonna hate, hater be my motivators,” said Higgins.

You cannot blame the average Joe for being jealous. With plenty of squats and weights, anyone can achieve hot legs.

 

 

Keep in touch with team through these links:

http://www.astate.edu/a/rugby/

https://www.facebook.com/asurugby

https://twitter.com/redwolvesrugby